Elizabeth I addressing the Troops at Tilbury before the arrival of the Spanish Armada 1588.

English Historical Fiction Authors: Elizabeth & Mary, Rival Queens: A Study of Leadership

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Elizabeth I’s Tilbury Speech – 9 August 1588

The Spanish Armada 8 – Elizabeth’s Tilbury Speech :The Elizabeth Files examines the truth about Queen Elizabeth I, and the Tudors

The Carey siblings were Elizabeth's only direct connection to her own mother (Mary Boleyn had unfortunately died in 1543). And, unlike most of Elizabeth I's friendships and romantic attachments, her Carey cousins' devotion to her never wavered. Elizabeth never had to question their integrity or loyalty, and she found great peace, and perhaps even a feeling of saftey, because of it.  Bess: Death Could Not Separate Them: How Elizabeth I Connected to Her Deceased Mother

A romantic interpretation of Queen Elizabeth I addressing her troops at Tilbury.

Queen Elizabeth addressing her troops at Tilbury on the eve of the arrival of the Spanish Armada. "I have the body of a weak and frail woman but I have the heart of a lion and a King and a King of England too!"

eyes :Queen Elizabeth addressing her troops at Tilbury on the eve of the arrival of the Spanish Armada.this shows the mentality elizabeth had and how commited and brave she was to defend englands aspects like culture the church

Queen Elizabeth I at Tilbury.  The Armada in the background

On This Day in Elizabethan History: Queen Elizabeth I Arrives at Tilbury

Funeral effigy of Elizabeth of York, Westminster Abbey Museum | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Funeral effigy of Elizabeth of York, Westminster Abbey Museum | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Glenda Jackson as Queen Elizabeth I in the BBC's Elizabeth R 1971. Tilbury costume. doublet is embossed leather.

This is one of the most famous speeches of all time – delivered by Elizabeth I to inspire her forces just before the arrival of…Continue readingAugust 1588 – Elizabeth’s Speech to her Troops at Tilbury

Elizabeth I after Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Queen Elizabeth I., circa late Possibly one of the portraits done for distribution, with Her Majesty's approval. So popular and in demand were her portraits, Elizabeth permitted mass production of her image, for the people.

When Edward IV married Elizabeth Woodville,he was defying conventions on several fronts.This wasn’t just about Elizabeth lacking royal status—Edward was taking a diplomatic gamble.To marry someone from within a country,and not someone foreign,risked disrupting the balance of internal politics.Not selecting a princess from the European princess-bride market rejected the prestige that came with a royal union.

My Great Grandmother: Elizabeth Woodville, Queen Consort of Edward IV; mother of Elizabeth of York, whose marriage to Henry VII joined the Lancaster and York factions and founded the Tudor dynasty.

Effigy of Joan Nevill, married William Fitzalan earl of Arundel. d.1462

JOAN NEVILLE, Countess of Westmorland (nee Beaufort) her tomb effigy in alabaster at St. Joan was daughter of John of Gaunt and half sister of Henry IV. She lies next to her husband Ralph Neville, Earl of Westmorland

Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Duchess of Bedford 18th great grandmother Birth 1416 in Artois, Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France Death 1472 in Grafton, Northamptonshire, England

Jacquetta of Luxembourg, Duchess of Bedford, Countess Rivers. Mother to Elizabeth Woodville, grandmother to Elizabeth of York, great grandmother to Henry VIII

Portrait miniature thought to be Elizabeth I, c.1560. She is wearing symbolic roses in her hair: red for the house of Lancaster and white for the house of York; the Tudor line merged both with the marriage of Henry Tudor/VII to Elizabeth of York, creating the iconic "Tudor rose". The Royal Collection.

Tudor Rose Queen: Elizabeth I, wearing symbolic roses in her hair: red for Lancaster and white for York (combining to create the Tudor rose).

Queen Elizabeth and Sir Walter Raleigh

Queen Elizabeth and Sir Walter Raleigh

High quality vintage art reproduction by Buyenlarge. One of many rare and wonderful images brought forward in time.

Blood group anomaly could explain Tudor king’s reproductive problems and tyrannical behavior. Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII.

Blood group anomaly could explain Tudor king’s reproductive problems and tyrannical behavior. Henry VIII June 1491 – 28 January was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII.

Elizabeth I ~ the greatest monarch in English history.

A humorous look at English words, their idiomatic and colorful nature. Daniel Carter tells his comical stories about his native tongue.

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