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The headdress of the traditional Turkic shaman is often called a böört, which is pronounced like bird, but with a "t" at the end. The Böört is a very important part of the shaman’s equipment. It not only protects the shaman from negative entities called Aza, it also gives the owner a light feeling in the head when it is put on.

Cenk Sertdemir is a Siberian Turkish shaman, called a Kham Kishi.

Cerimônia de iniciação dos adolescentes, do povo Selk´nam - Terra do Fogo.

Selknam People during the Hain Ceremony in Tierra Del Fuego. Photo by German priest and anthropologist Martin Gusinde,

Jochelson, Waldemar, 1855-1937: Yukaghir shaman in ceremonial dress [with drum], Siberia, Russia, 1902

shaman photo: Yukaghir shaman in ceremonial dress [with drum], Siberia, Russia, 1902

S. M. Shirokogoroff

Shaman’s Costume Mongolia The National Museum of Mongolia “This is an elaborate shaman’s costume. The Caftan is of cotton with a woven geometrical pattern. The gown hanging over the chest has a nickel-plated brass mirror to ward off evil spirits.

Group of Even (Lamut) women with national costumes. Okhotsk okrug. Begining the XX. century.

Evenk women The Evenks or Evenky are a Tugusic people living in Siberia and the Russian Far East.

* Shaman Anissia cleanses the inside of a nomad's yurt from evil spirits.   Republic of Tuva, village of Belder. Photo © A. Abbas/Magnum

* Shaman Anissia cleanses the inside of a nomad's yurt from evil spirits. Republic of Tuva, village of Belder.

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