Explore Ancient Mesopotamia, Sumerian, and more!

Babylonian grammatical text stone tablet used in the research and assembly of  a 21-volume dictionary of the language of ancient Mesopotamia and its Babylonian and Assyrian dialects. Unspoken for 2,000 years but preserved on clay tablets and in stone inscriptions deciphered over the last two centuries. Dictionary finally completed by scholars at the University of Chicago.

Ancient Assyrian Dictionary Completed by University of Chicago Scholars

BABYLONIAN GRAMMATICAL TEXT STONE (used in the research and assembly of a dictionary of the language of ancient Mesopotamia and its Babylonian and Assyrian dialects, both unspoken for years, preserved on clay tablets and in stone inscriptions)

The 4000 year old clay tablet containing the story of the flood stands on display at the British Museum in London.

The 4000 year old clay tablet containing the story of the Ark and the flood stands on display at the British Museum in London. According to a book by Irving Finkel of the British Museum.

Bead dedicated To The Moon God  --  Neo Sumerian  --  Reign of Ibbi-Sin, King of Ur  --  Circa 2020 BCE

Banded Agate Bead dedicated to the moon god. Neo Sumerian, reign of Ibbi-Sin,king of Ur - 2020 BCE

The Codex Gigas. The largest medieval manuscript in existence, created by a single scribe in the early 13th century. Sometimes called “The Devil’s Bible” because of a large unexplained picture of him. Lavishly illustrated. Just the writing alone, not counting the illustrations, would have taken five years of constant writing to complete

The Codex Gigas. The largest medieval manuscript in existence. Written by a single scribe in the century. Sometimes called The Devil's Bible because of the large, unexplained picture of Satan in the middle of the book.

Early Sumerian pictographic tablet, c. 3100 BCE. This archaic pictographic script contained the seeds for the development of writing.

early sumerian pictographic tablet 3100 BCE Clay Tablet Carved using a wedged stylus Sumeria T-Sumerian Pictographic Tablet A-Prehistoric people or scribes BCE M-Clay T-Engraving U-Record Keeping

The Sun-god Shamash in his Shrine.    Stone tablet of Nebopaliddin, King of Babylonia (c . 880 B.C.), representing Shamash, the sun-god of Sippar, seated in his shrine with the king (second figure) led into the god’s presence by a priest, and followed by A, the consort of Shamash—the goddess interceding, as it were, on behalf of the king.

The Sun-god Shamash of Sippar in his Shrine. Stone tablet of Nebopaliddin, King of Babylonia, seated in his shrine with the king led into the god’s presence by a priest.

Dr Irving Finkel, Assistant Keeper of the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, translated the cuneiform script on the tablet. There are dozens of ancient tablets that have been found which describe the flood story but Finkel, Assistant Keeper of Ancient Mesopotamian script, languages and cultures Department at the British Museum, says this one is the first to describe the vessel's shape.

Ancient Babylonian text reveals Noah's Ark was a coracle made of reeds

Dr Irving Finkel, Assistant Keeper of the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum, translated the cuneiform script on the tablet.

The Earliest Autograph Signatures (Circa 3,100 BCE) A pictographic list of titles and professions in ancient Sumeria (top), with the scribe's signature on the reverse side (bottom.) (View Larger) Pictographic lexical lists written in ancient Sumerian pictographic script on clay tablets are the earliest literature known, and also the earliest known evidence of school and learning.

The Earliest Autograph Signatures (Circa BCE) A pictographic list of titles and professions in ancient Sumeria (top), with the scribe's signature on the reverse side (bottom.

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