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Horrible part of our history. Photos of real captured runaway slaves, taken by Fabrice Monteiro. entitled "Marrons. Les esclaves fugitifs".  Slaves who tried to escape suffering the punishment described by the law then they were made to wear a heavy iron necklace with long stems, which had the function to hang in the brush and hamper any escape.

Les esclaves fugitifs" (Brown Runaway Fugitive Slaves) photographed by Fabrice Monteiro "Brown. Fugitive Slave," is an .

*SLAVERY~This might upset some people, (it should ) but it's real and it happened to slaves who were treated as objects.

Image: French School - Slaves in Brazil: The Terrible Torture of a Slave, from 'Journal des Voyages'

Sara Lucy Bagby Johnson(1833-1906) was the last known 'fugitive slave' in U.S. history. Lucy escaped via the Underground Railroad to PA then on to Cleveland, Ohio. Her owner, William Goshorn(WV), eventually located her, and she was returned under the provisions of the Fugitive Slave law. One can only imagine what she went through. She was eventually saved by a Union Captain around the time period of the execution of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. Exact date is unknown.

Sara Lucy Bagby was the last known 'fugitive slave' in U. Lucy escaped via the Underground Railroad to PA then on to Cleveland, Ohio. Her owner, William Goshorn(WV), eventually located her, and she was returned under the prov

Carlota, also known as La Negra Carlota (died March 1844) was a Cuban slave woman of Yoruba origin.[1] She was one of the three leaders of slave rebellion on Cuba during the Year of the Lash in 1843-1844.[1] Carlota led the slave uprising of the sugar mill "Triunvirato" in the province of Matanzas (Cuba) on November 5, 1843.

Carlota, leader of the 1843 slave rebellion in Triumvirato, Matanzas

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European settlers and enslaved Africans introduced Malaria and other tropical diseases to the Americas. These tropical diseases thrived in the swampy region of the Lowcountry. While many slaves were more resistant, the white planters were not. Therefore, whites moved their homes away from the rice fields and vacated the lowcountry at least during the humid season. For the Lowcountry Gullah, this isolation allowed for the creation and preservation of their distinct African culture.

Gullah Culture Thrived in Desolate Conditions

A former slave reveals the scars on his back from whippings before he escaped 1863

Escaped slave displays wounds from torture His photo serves as an everlasting memory of this painful history our country has. May we never forget, and may we never (similarly) repeat our mistakes.

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