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Antique Pair of Chinese Imperial Silk Embroidery Rank Badge C19th. Five tail feathers possibly indicate a silver pheasant of the 5th rank

Antique Pair of Chinese Imperial Silk Embroidery Rank Badge Five tail feathers possibly indicate a silver pheasant of the rank

Rank Badge with Wild Goose Period: Qing dynasty (1644–1911) Date: 18th century Culture: China Medium: Silk and metallic thread embroidery on silk satin

Rank Badge with Wild Goose Period: Qing dynasty Date: century Culture: China Medium: Silk and metallic thread embroidery on silk satin

Chair strip with auspicious patterns (one of a pair), Qing dynasty (1644–1911), 18th century  China  Tapestry-woven (kesi) silk and metallic thread

One of a Pair of Chair Strips with Auspicious Patterns

Chair strip with auspicious patterns (one of a pair), Qing dynasty century China Tapestry-woven (kesi) silk and metallic thread METMUSEUM.

Title: Embroidery  Artist: Unknown (Chinese)  Year: c. 1860-1880    Art Movement: Chinese Qing dynasty (1644-1911) - China  Materials/Techniques: Satin stitch and couched metallic thread

Title: Embroidery Artist: Unknown (Chinese) Year: c. Art Movement: Chinese Qing dynasty - China Materials/Techniques: Satin stitch and couched metallic thread

Frontside Court Insignia Badge (Buzi) for a Military Official of the 2nd Rank, kesi embroidered, China, 19th century. Photo Nagel

Frontside Court Insignia Badge (Buzi) for a Military Official of the Rank, kesi embroidered, China, century.

Gold embroidered red Mangpao, Late Qing dynasty. Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Red & Gold - Detail of Festival Robe, Qing dynasty The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

From a fragment of Chinese embroidery from the Qing Dynasty (circa 1870), likely part of a skirt panel.#ChineseTextiles

The design in the upper left is a bat. It's a traditional design. From a fragment of Chinese embroidery from the Qing Dynasty (circa likely part of a skirt panel.

A metal thread-embroidered velvet Panel Northern India, circa 1900 the blue velvet ground profusely embroidered with silver and gold thread with a flowering plant with two perching peacocks, beneath the plant a pool and two stalks 110 x 48 cm.

An Indian gilt embroidered panel metal thread embroidered velvet panel, Northern India, circa 1900

The qilin is a fantastic animal shown here in its conventional form. The flames shooting from the creature's body signify its supernatural powers. After 1662 the qilin became the insignia of military officials of the first rank; before that time it was worn by nobles

Rank Badge with Qilin Period: Qing dynasty Date: late century Culture: China Medium: Silk and metallic thread embroidery on plain-weave silk patterned in gauze Accession Number:

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