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Velizar Semionovski

Two inexperienced American lions-teens ‪ atrox, jump away terrified in front of the terrible teeth of a decisive female ‪ who is blindly angry after the predators attacked her calf . Pleistocene of Texas.

Anancus at Quarternary Safari.

Anancus at Quarternary Safari.

Uma cena que pode ter acontecido na Cueva del Milodon, atual Chile: um Mylodon observa uma onça-patagônica Panthera onca mesembrina (uma forma extinta) atacar um grupo de cavalos também extintos (Hippidion). Ilustração: Peter Snowball, NHMPL

Chile's Cueva del Milodon, Patagonia some years ago or more by Peter Snowball

Mastodon by Robert Thom

Mastodon by Robert Thom

Megalotragus | Megalotragus by TORIMORRIS, Africa, about 10,000 BC

Megalotragus | Megalotragus by TORIMORRIS, Africa, about 10,000 BC

Daily Paleo Art Month #3: Ekaltadeta A marsupial related to the potorids (edit: actually that should be the musky rat-kangaroo; thank you noddytheornithopod!), Ekaltadeta lived in northern Australia between 25 and 15 million years ago. Only known from skull material, it was probably roughly the size of a typical modern wallaby – about 80cm long (31in) and weighing around 10-15kg (22-33lbs). Ekaltadeta’s lower incisors were very long, protruding and almost dagger-like. Along with some some…

Daily Paleo Art Month Ekaltadeta A marsupial related to the potorids (edit: actually that should be the musky rat-kangaroo;), Ekaltadeta lived in northern Australia between 25 and 15 million years ago.

Mauricio Anton South American mammal assemblage

Dinosaur Art book review

Floridatragulus, an odd long-snouted camelid which roamed North America between 20 and 16 million years ago. The reason for its long nose is unknown – perhaps it allowed it to graze while keeping its eyes high enough to see over tall grasses, or to reach vegetation that other herbivores couldn’t.  Modern camelids are found in Africa and the Middle East (dromedary camel), Central Asia (bactrian camel), and South America (llama, guanaco, vicuña, and alpaca), but the group originally evolved…

Floridatragulus, an odd long-snouted camelid which roamed North America between 20 and 16 million years ago. The reason for its long nose is unknown – perhaps it allowed it to graze while keeping its eyes high enough to see over tall grasses, or to reach vegetation that other herbivores couldn’t. Modern camelids are found in Africa and the Middle East (dromedary camel), Central Asia (bactrian camel), and South America (llama, guanaco, vicuña, and alpaca), but the group originally evolved…

New post on scientificillustration

Artwork by Lucas Lima This extinct elephant relative was one of the largest in its family tree, reaching up to meter ft) tall. Interestingly, some small species from the island of Flores, Indonesia, shrunk to only a third of that size.

Second most badass Marsupial ever  - Thylacosmilus Atrox. Kaek on DeviantArt

Thylacosmilus atrox is an extinct species of saber-toothed metatherian that inhabited South America from the late Miocene to late Pliocene epochs Thylacosmilus Atrox

Hexaprotodon sivalensis

10 Strange Prehistoric Animals

www.nwtexhibits.ca steppebison climatechange index.html

A Serengeti of the north, two Russian's scientists dream of one day recreating the Ice Age, mammoths included, all to help fight climate change.

Turpanotherium elegans by sinammonite.deviantart.com on @deviantART

Turpanotherium elegans by sinammonite.deviantart.com on @deviantART

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