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La asombrosa cantidad de criaturas que conviven en una gota de agua marina - ANTENA 3 TV

This Is How A Single Drop Of Seawater Looks Magnified 25 Times image courtesy: David Liittschwager Photographer David Littschwager captured this amazing shot of a single drop of seawater magnified

Image result for human skin cells

Calendula officinalis Extracts Protect against Induced Chromosome Damage on HacaT Human Skin Cells

Crab larva  inside salt water

Under the microscope: Just a splash of seawater but alive with plankton

drop of ocean water magnified reveals nature of plankton

Bacteriologic Chart  1. Gonococcus spp.  2. Pneumococcus spp.  3, Streptococcus pyogenes  4. Micobacterium tuberculosis  5. Vibrio cholerae  6. Corynebacterium diphtheriae  7. Bacterium typhosum  8. Bacterium dysenteriae  9. Achorion Schonleinii [favus fungus]  10. Bacillus anthracis  11. Bacillus aerogenes capsulatus  12. Yeast cells - With buds and ascospores depicted  Postmortem Pathology. Henry W. Cattell, 1906.

Lysogenic viruses infect cells but can delay the production of new viruses; they can cause diseases such as Diphtheria or Scarlett Fever.

https://cosmosmagazine.com/life-sciences/secret-life-plankton

Secret life of plankton

Una célula humana infectada se rompe, liberando una corriente de nuevos virus (en azul) en el sistema

Very devious - The common cold virus, constantly mutates to avoid detection. Just how totally viruses can overcome a healthy host is seen when an infected human cell ruptures, releasing a stream of new viruses (blue) into the system.

T4 phage, via Purdue University and Seyet LLC Source: https://news.uns.purdue.edu/x/2008b/081118SeyetGraphic.html

A virus about to insert its genes into a microbe. One of trillions of viruses that live inside us and may keep us healthy. More details at The Loom.

The EMBO Journal Cover Contest 2012 has its first winner! This hand-coloured scanning electron micrograph was the favourite of the jury in the section "Best Scientific Image". The image shows the surface of a mosquito egg (from Culex pipiens), which generates a water repellent network by connecting microscopically small structures to trap a thin layer of air.

The image shows the surface of a mosquito egg (from Culex pipiens), which generates a water repellent network by connecting microscopically small structures to trap a thin layer of air. (Credit: Martin Oeggerli, The EMBO Journal)

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