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Renaissance-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Renaissance-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Renaissance-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Homo Filinus? Louis XIV court philosopher's mental doodles comparing human phisionomy to animal

French painter (and Art Theorist) Charles Le Brun

ॐﷲ✡♥MØÐGØЊFRÈÉFØRÜΜŠ.ÕRG♥✡ﷲॐ☪✞ • View topic - Charles Le ...

ॐﷲ✡♥MØÐGØЊFRÈÉFØRÜΜŠ.ÕRG♥✡ﷲॐ☪✞ • View topic - Charles Le ...

Morel d'Arleux's Système de Lebrun  sur la Physionomie

as imagined by Charles Le Brun, the most prominent artist of the century in France.

Renaissance-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Renaissance-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Renaissance-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Renaissance-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

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Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution Charles Le Brun used his artistry to compare human and animal faces

Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

Baroque-Era Drawings Reveal Early Ideas About Evolution

In the late French artist Charles Le Brun created a series of works based around what he imagined humans would look like if they had evolved from different species.

「人類が様々な動物から進化していたらと仮定したイラスト」海外の反応|暇は無味無臭の劇薬

This plate, from Charles Le Brun s study of human types and animals, demonstrates the resemblance between a man and a horse. Charles Le Brun was a p )

Physiognomy:  The goal of physiognomy is to judge character according to features of the face. LeBrun studied the lines linking different points of the head in a complex geometry which revealed the faculties of the spirit or character. Thus, the angle formed by the axis of the eyes and the eyesbrows could lead to various conclusions, depending upon whether or not this angle rose toward the forehead to join the soul or descented toward the nose and mouth, which were considered to be animal…

From Charles Le Brun’s 1671 series of comparative drawings of human and animal faces depicting the physiognomy theory and also part of his own treatise on the subject.

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