Mary mcleod bethune

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Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) devoted her life to promoting equal education for Black girls & women. "For I am my mother's daughter, and the drums of Africa still beat in my heart. They will not let me rest while there is a single Negro boy or girl without a chance to prove his worth."                                                                                                                                                     More

Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) devoted her life to promoting equal education for Black girls & women. "For I am my mother's daughter, and the drums of Africa still beat in my heart. They will not let me rest while there is a single Negro boy or girl without a chance to prove his worth." More

Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, 1949. African American civil rights activist and educator who founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls.

Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, 1949. African American civil rights activist and educator who founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls.

On October 3, 1904 Mary McLeod Bethune opened a normal and industrial school for African-American girls in Daytona Beach, FL. Started in a rented house with only five students, in less than two years she attracted 250 pupils. By 1916, the school had grown into the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute and was affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The school merged in 1923 with Cookman Institute for boys located in Jacksonville and became Bethune-Cookman College.

On October 3, 1904 Mary McLeod Bethune opened a normal and industrial school for African-American girls in Daytona Beach, FL. Started in a rented house with only five students, in less than two years she attracted 250 pupils. By 1916, the school had grown into the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute and was affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The school merged in 1923 with Cookman Institute for boys located in Jacksonville and became Bethune-Cookman College.

Mary Bethune lifted herself from the cotton field to the White House as an adviser to the President of the United States. Her greatest accomplishment, however, was almost single-handily building Bethune-Cookman College  in 1923.

Mary Bethune lifted herself from the cotton field to the White House as an adviser to the President of the United States. Her greatest accomplishment, however, was almost single-handily building Bethune-Cookman College in 1923.

By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the 17 children born to black parents recently freed after the Civil War. Although Bethune was born.. ...By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the…

By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the 17 children born to black parents recently freed after the Civil War. Although Bethune was born.. ...By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the…

Mary McLeod Bethune, educator & civil rights leader best known for starting a school for African-American students that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University, and for being an advisor to FDR. She dedicated her life to educating both whites & blacks about the accomplishments & needs of black people, writing, "Not only the Negro child but children of all races should read & know of the achievements and deeds of the Negro." R.I.P.

Mary McLeod Bethune, educator & civil rights leader best known for starting a school for African-American students that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University, and for being an advisor to FDR. She dedicated her life to educating both whites & blacks about the accomplishments & needs of black people, writing, "Not only the Negro child but children of all races should read & know of the achievements and deeds of the Negro." R.I.P.

Sure didn't read about this in the history books! It was first known as the Federal Council of Negro Affairs. Mary McLeod Bethune was the director of the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration; William H. Hastie was assistant solicitor in the Department of the Interior; and Robert C. Weaver served as a special assistant to the Administrator of the United States Housing Authority. There were over 45 council members. National Museum of American History.

Sure didn't read about this in the history books! It was first known as the Federal Council of Negro Affairs. Mary McLeod Bethune was the director of the Division of Negro Affairs of the National Youth Administration; William H. Hastie was assistant solicitor in the Department of the Interior; and Robert C. Weaver served as a special assistant to the Administrator of the United States Housing Authority. There were over 45 council members. National Museum of American History.

:::::::::: Antique Photograph ::::::::::  Mary McLeod Bethune was born in Mayesville, South Carolina, the 15th of 17th children. Her parents, Samuel and Patsy McLeod, and her oldest brothers and sisters, were slaves before emancipation when the Union won the Civil War. In her early years, she picked cotton and attended a Methodist mission school.

:::::::::: Antique Photograph :::::::::: Mary McLeod Bethune was born in Mayesville, South Carolina, the 15th of 17th children. Her parents, Samuel and Patsy McLeod, and her oldest brothers and sisters, were slaves before emancipation when the Union won the Civil War. In her early years, she picked cotton and attended a Methodist mission school.

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