Mary McLeod Bethune became the first African American woman to head a federal agency when she was appointed to Director of the Division of Negro Affairs in 1938.

Mary McLeod Bethune became the first African American woman to head a federal agency when she was appointed to Director of the Division of Negro Affairs in 1938.

Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, 1949. African American civil rights activist and educator who founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls.

Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, 1949. African American civil rights activist and educator who founded the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls.

Mary McLeod Bethune   A relative descendant of hers will be on Our show this evening.   R/T & Share the timeline for details!

Mary McLeod Bethune A relative descendant of hers will be on Our show this evening. R/T & Share the timeline for details!

On October 3, 1904, a very determined young black woman, Mary McLeod Bethune, opened the Daytona Literary and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls with $1.50, faith in God and five little girls: Lena, Lucille, and Ruth Warren, Anna Geiger and Celest Jackson. Through Dr. Bethune’s lifetime th...On October 3, 1904, a very determined young black woman, Mary McLeod Bethune, opened the Daytona Literary and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls with $1.50, faith in God and five little…

On October 3, 1904, a very determined young black woman, Mary McLeod Bethune, opened the Daytona Literary and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls with $1.50, faith in God and five little girls: Lena, Lucille, and Ruth Warren, Anna Geiger and Celest Jackson. Through Dr. Bethune’s lifetime th...On October 3, 1904, a very determined young black woman, Mary McLeod Bethune, opened the Daytona Literary and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls with $1.50, faith in God and five little…

Mary Bethune lifted herself from the cotton field to the White House as an adviser to the President of the United States. Her greatest accomplishment, however, was almost single-handily building Bethune-Cookman College  in 1923.

Mary Bethune lifted herself from the cotton field to the White House as an adviser to the President of the United States. Her greatest accomplishment, however, was almost single-handily building Bethune-Cookman College in 1923.

Production. Launching of the SS Booker T. Washington. Marian Anderson, celebrated contralto, and Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs, National Youth Administration (NYA), at the launching of the SS Booker T. Washington, first Liberty Ship named for a Negro, at the California Shipbuilding Corporation's yards

Production. Launching of the SS Booker T. Washington. Marian Anderson, celebrated contralto, and Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs, National Youth Administration (NYA), at the launching of the SS Booker T. Washington, first Liberty Ship named for a Negro, at the California Shipbuilding Corporation's yards

By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the 17 children born to black parents recently freed after the Civil War. Although Bethune was born.. ...By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the…

By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the 17 children born to black parents recently freed after the Civil War. Although Bethune was born.. ...By Kelvin Muhia Mary McLeod Bethune is one of the black American women who changed the face of America during the 20th century. Born on 10th July 1875 in South Carolina, Bethune was the 15th of the…

Production. Launching of the SS Booker T. Washington. Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs, National Youth Administration (NYA); Marian Anderson, celebrated contralto; and Dr. William J. Thompkins, Recorder of Deeds, Washington, D.C., congratulate Negro workmen who helped construct the SS Booker T. Washington, first Liberty Ship named for a Negro

Production. Launching of the SS Booker T. Washington. Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs, National Youth Administration (NYA); Marian Anderson, celebrated contralto; and Dr. William J. Thompkins, Recorder of Deeds, Washington, D.C., congratulate Negro workmen who helped construct the SS Booker T. Washington, first Liberty Ship named for a Negro

Click here for a great packet for students about Mary McLeod Bethune from her homesite museum (managed by the National Park Service)

Click here for a great packet for students about Mary McLeod Bethune from her homesite museum (managed by the National Park Service)

Production. Launching of the SS Booker T. Washington. Marian Anderson, celebrated contralto who sponsored the SS Booker T. Washington, and Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs, National Youth Administration (NYA), are shown with a group of Negroes workmen who helped construct the first Liberty Ship named for a Negro at the California Shipbuilding Corporation's yards at Wilmington, California

Production. Launching of the SS Booker T. Washington. Marian Anderson, celebrated contralto who sponsored the SS Booker T. Washington, and Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs, National Youth Administration (NYA), are shown with a group of Negroes workmen who helped construct the first Liberty Ship named for a Negro at the California Shipbuilding Corporation's yards at Wilmington, California

Mary McLeod Bethune achieved her greatest recognition at the Washington, DC townhouse that is now this National Historic Site. The Council House was the first headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) and was Bethune’s last home in Washington, DC. From here, Bethune and the NCNW spearheaded strategies and developed programs that advanced the interests of African American women.

Mary McLeod Bethune achieved her greatest recognition at the Washington, DC townhouse that is now this National Historic Site. The Council House was the first headquarters of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) and was Bethune’s last home in Washington, DC. From here, Bethune and the NCNW spearheaded strategies and developed programs that advanced the interests of African American women.

On October 3, 1904 Mary McLeod Bethune opened a normal and industrial school for African-American girls in Daytona Beach, FL. Started in a rented house with only five students, in less than two years she attracted 250 pupils. By 1916, the school had grown into the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute and was affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The school merged in 1923 with Cookman Institute for boys located in Jacksonville and became Bethune-Cookman College.

On October 3, 1904 Mary McLeod Bethune opened a normal and industrial school for African-American girls in Daytona Beach, FL. Started in a rented house with only five students, in less than two years she attracted 250 pupils. By 1916, the school had grown into the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute and was affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The school merged in 1923 with Cookman Institute for boys located in Jacksonville and became Bethune-Cookman College.

Mary McLeod Bethune; a Missionary to Her Own People - Church History For Kids

Mary McLeod Bethune; a Missionary to Her Own People - Church History For Kids

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