Whilst in Milan, Leonardo became very interested in Mathematics, also.  He illustrated one of the first modern math books, done by a friend of his, Luca Pacioli.

Whilst in Milan, Leonardo became very interested in Mathematics, also. He illustrated one of the first modern Mathematics books, done by a friend of his, Luca Pacioli.

Leonardo da Vinci drew the illustrations for Luca Pacioli's 1509 book De Divina Proportione (The Divine Proportion). Drawing of the Duodecedron Abscisus Elevatus Vacuus, consisting of 120 equilateral triangles, from the manuscript of the book.

Euler and da Vinci shared not only a birthday, but a secondary career as physicists whose work is still vital in today's world: sliding friction, frictional coefficients, beam equations, polyhedra.

This looks like an alchemist and his minion to me! (Italy, 1495.)

date: Portrait of the Mathematician, Frà Luca Pacioli - central figure in this painting exhibited in the Museo e Gallerie di Capodimonte in Napoli (Italy). The painter is unknown, although some people are convinced the painter is Jacopo de’ Barbari

Luca Pacioli | Leonardo da Vinci | De Divina Proportione

Luca Pacioli | Leonardo da Vinci | De Divina Proportione

Luca Pacioli | Leonardo da Vinci | De Divina Proportione

Luca Pacioli | Leonardo da Vinci | De Divina Proportione

Luca Pacioli | Leonardo da Vinci

Luca Pacioli | Leonardo da Vinci

Stella Octangula from "De Divina Proportione" by Luca Pacioli Published 1509 Venice  by Leonardo Da Vinci

Stella Octangula, from "De Divina Proportione" by Luca Pacioli, Published 1509, Venice

Leonardo da Vinci drew the illustrations for Luca Pacioli's 1509 book De Divina Proportione (The Divine Proportion). Drawing of the truncated icosahedron, from the manuscript of the book.

Leonardo da vinci 1502 Basic shape of a soccer ball, first used in mexico 1970

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