Columbia

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The 8 Smartest Cities In Latin America | Co.Exist | ideas + impact  Great for those of us who are trying to incorporate literacy and and socially conscious objectives into our Spanish curricula! ;)

The 8 Smartest Cities In Latin America

Tequendama Falls, Bogata, Columbia www.casaruralnavarra-urbasaurederra.com http://nacedero-rio-urederra.blogspot.com.es http://navarraturismoynaturaleza.blogspot.com.es/ http://mundoturismorural.blogspot.com.es/

Tequendama Falls, Bogata, Columbia.

Tequendama-falls-bogata-columbia - Tequendama Falls (or Salto del Tequendama) is a major tourist attraction about 30 km southwest of Bogotá, the capital city of Colombia.Do you like to visit?

Colombia: travel books to read before you go. << This excerpt from Lonely Planet’s Colombia guide provides a selection of travel literature to get you in the mood for your trip.

Colombia: travel books to read before you go. << This excerpt from Lonely Planet’s Colombia guide provides a selection of travel literature to get you in the mood for your trip.

Awesome. "Since the late 1990s, teacher-turned-mobile-librarian Luis Soriano has brought books to thousands of children in rural Colombia, all from the back of a donkey. The biblioburro, as Soriano calls it, helps poor children have access to more books and thus a chance at a better education. 'That’s how a community changes and the child becomes a good citizen and a useful person,' Soriano told CNN. 'Literature is how we connect them with the world.'"

"Since teacher-turned-mobile-librarian Luis Soriano has brought books to thousands of children in rural Colombia, all from the back of a donkey"

Gabriel José de la Concordia García Márquez  is a Colombian novelist, short-story writer, screenwriter and journalist, known affectionately as Gabo throughout Latin America. Considered one of the most significant authors of the 20th century, he was awarded the 1972 Neustadt International Prize for Literature and the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature, and is the earliest remaining living recipient.

“Our independence from Spanish domination did not put us beyond the reach of madness,” said Gabriel García Márquez in his 1982 Nobel Prize acceptance speech.

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