Literature

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“From its very inception, the South created a mythology for itself (one thinks of Thomas Jefferson’s ‘Notes on the State of Virginia’ here with its utopian vision of independent yeoman farmers striving for perfectibility) that was predicated on the vision of a settled, stable and unchanging region based upon agrarian values.” — Christopher J. Walsh

“From its very inception, the South created a mythology for itself (one thinks of Thomas Jefferson’s ‘Notes on the State of Virginia’ here with its utopian vision of independent yeoman farmers striving for perfectibility) that was predicated on the vision of a settled, stable and unchanging region based upon agrarian values.” — Christopher J. Walsh

“The heroine who gravely ponders etiquette while running for her life is a peculiar feature of Ann Radcliffe’s Gothic.” — J. C. Oleson

“The heroine who gravely ponders etiquette while running for her life is a peculiar feature of Ann Radcliffe’s Gothic.” — J. C. Oleson

“In the attempt to rationalise Erzsébet Báthory’s sexual and murderous perversions as related to her psychopathic madness, Valentine Penrose reveals that not only was she was born in 1560 within the mould of sorcery but she was also the product of much inbreeding typical of the Hungarian upper class to which her family belonged.” — Cristina Santos

“In the attempt to rationalise Erzsébet Báthory’s sexual and murderous perversions as related to her psychopathic madness, Valentine Penrose reveals that not only was she was born in 1560 within the mould of sorcery but she was also the product of much inbreeding typical of the Hungarian upper class to which her family belonged.” — Cristina Santos

“Neo-Victorianism is a historical genre that is highly preoccupied with gender issues, and its revisionary enterprise stretches far beyond a mere rescue of lost voices and the re-imagination of the fates of marginalised people to retrieve them from historical oblivion.” — Lin Elinor Pettersson

“Neo-Victorianism is a historical genre that is highly preoccupied with gender issues, and its revisionary enterprise stretches far beyond a mere rescue of lost voices and the re-imagination of the fates of marginalised people to retrieve them from historical oblivion.” — Lin Elinor Pettersson

“Frankenstein’s monster and Dracula the vampire are, unlike previous monsters, dynamic, totalizing monsters. This is what makes them frightening. Before, things were different.” — Franco Moretti

“Frankenstein’s monster and Dracula the vampire are, unlike previous monsters, dynamic, totalizing monsters. This is what makes them frightening. Before, things were different.” — Franco Moretti

“Horror often threatens or enacts violence. If it opens the door to expose that of which we are afraid, this is the door to a hidden room we would rather ignore. What is hidden, and suppressed in what is familiar, is most horrifying. Subversive, horror is frequently spatialised and quite literally looks beneath the surface, into the cracks, below the floorboards, or up in the attic, in the corners.” — Gina Wisker

“Horror often threatens or enacts violence. If it opens the door to expose that of which we are afraid, this is the door to a hidden room we would rather ignore. What is hidden, and suppressed in what is familiar, is most horrifying. Subversive, horror is frequently spatialised and quite literally looks beneath the surface, into the cracks, below the floorboards, or up in the attic, in the corners.” — Gina Wisker

“Fictional revisitings of the nineteenth-century by authors such as Dame Antonia Susan Duffy, Michel Faber, Amitav Ghosh, and Sarah Waters have topped bestseller lists and have begun to form part of a neo-Victorian canon that, since the turn of the new millennium, has begun to receive significant critical attention.” — Nadine Muller

“Fictional revisitings of the nineteenth-century by authors such as Dame Antonia Susan Duffy, Michel Faber, Amitav Ghosh, and Sarah Waters have topped bestseller lists and have begun to form part of a neo-Victorian canon that, since the turn of the new millennium, has begun to receive significant critical attention.” — Nadine Muller

“Georges Albert Maurice Victor Bataille, so focused on death, and Sigmund Freud, so reluctant to admit of its psychic influence. In bringing them together we can give a twist to Sigmund Freud by reintroducing death into his system.” — Liran Razinsky

“Georges Albert Maurice Victor Bataille, so focused on death, and Sigmund Freud, so reluctant to admit of its psychic influence. In bringing them together we can give a twist to Sigmund Freud by reintroducing death into his system.” — Liran Razinsky

“[...] although such an obsession may seem macabre to us, it is important to remember that from the 1780s and continuing through the 1830s, throughout the parishes of Paris, France, dead bodies began floating to the surface of the graveyards that encircled a number of city churches.” — Diane Hoeveler

“[...] although such an obsession may seem macabre to us, it is important to remember that from the 1780s and continuing through the 1830s, throughout the parishes of Paris, France, dead bodies began floating to the surface of the graveyards that encircled a number of city churches.” — Diane Hoeveler

“Most current ideas of the relation between Satyricon and the Greek novel have their origins in the thesis advanced by Richard Heinze that the Satyricon reverses the standard story about the adventures of a devoted heterosexual couple by presenting the antics of a homosexual couple, at certain points a threesome, and by painting these events on the canvas of a lowlife scenario.” — Andrew Laird

“Most current ideas of the relation between Satyricon and the Greek novel have their origins in the thesis advanced by Richard Heinze that the Satyricon reverses the standard story about the adventures of a devoted heterosexual couple by presenting the antics of a homosexual couple, at certain points a threesome, and by painting these events on the canvas of a lowlife scenario.” — Andrew Laird

“In writing of the nineteenth-century which manifests a gothic turn, there is an embrace of the uncanny within ourselves rather than a displacement or projection on to some foreign or distant other.” — Julian Wolfreys

“In writing of the nineteenth-century which manifests a gothic turn, there is an embrace of the uncanny within ourselves rather than a displacement or projection on to some foreign or distant other.” — Julian Wolfreys

“These creatures, despite being utterly unrealistic, inspire a visceral reaction of fear and terror, perhaps because many of them may take a human shape and therefore pass themselves off as normal, something that can cause a massive amount of consternation when the creature is, in fact, far from human.” — Rachel M. Hultquist

“These creatures, despite being utterly unrealistic, inspire a visceral reaction of fear and terror, perhaps because many of them may take a human shape and therefore pass themselves off as normal, something that can cause a massive amount of consternation when the creature is, in fact, far from human.” — Rachel M. Hultquist

“Ghost stories and stories of terrifying occurrences, abundant in the folklore of other peoples, may also be found in the Latvian oral heritage, mainly in the form of legends.” — Bārbala Simsone

“Ghost stories and stories of terrifying occurrences, abundant in the folklore of other peoples, may also be found in the Latvian oral heritage, mainly in the form of legends.” — Bārbala Simsone

“While the authors of the previous century wrote almost exclusively for an aristocratic élite, the rise of a trading middle class and the development of urban areas enlarged the reading public.” — Giulia Mariotto

“While the authors of the previous century wrote almost exclusively for an aristocratic élite, the rise of a trading middle class and the development of urban areas enlarged the reading public.” — Giulia Mariotto

“DC Comics launched their Vertigo imprint in 1993, using six favourite series from the 1980s, all of which were reworkings of older DC Comics supernatural or horror characters (‘The Sandman,’ ‘Swamp Thing,’ ‘Hellblazer,’ ‘Animal Man,’ ‘Shade: the Changing Man’ and ‘Doom Patrol’).” — Julia Round

“DC Comics launched their Vertigo imprint in 1993, using six favourite series from the 1980s, all of which were reworkings of older DC Comics supernatural or horror characters (‘The Sandman,’ ‘Swamp Thing,’ ‘Hellblazer,’ ‘Animal Man,’ ‘Shade: the Changing Man’ and ‘Doom Patrol’).” — Julia Round

“Late Victorian gothic monsters, moreover, typically do not show themselves as fully formed monsters when they make their entry into the fictional worlds that resist them but rather become monstrous through transformative processes that give form and impulse to their narrative development” — Mario Ortiz-Robles

“Late Victorian gothic monsters, moreover, typically do not show themselves as fully formed monsters when they make their entry into the fictional worlds that resist them but rather become monstrous through transformative processes that give form and impulse to their narrative development” — Mario Ortiz-Robles

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