Ahmed Alkasy

Ahmed Alkasy

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Ahmed Alkasy
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MRI of brain shows a cystic lesion in the cerebellum with an enhancing nodule (post-Gadolinium)

MRI of brain shows a cystic lesion in the cerebellum with an enhancing nodule (post-Gadolinium)

Acoustic schwannoma: most common cerebellopontine angle tumour.The most common presenting symptoms include; sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. Contrast enhaced MRI is the investigation of choice for such lesions.

Vertigo for dizziness vertigo symptoms with anxiety,benign paroxysmal positional vertigo examination vertigo vape,what herbs are good for vertigo vertigo with ear crystals.

Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial tumours of the central nervous system. They are a non-glial neoplasm that originates from the arachnoid cap cells of the meninges. Meningiomas have characteristic imaging findings although there are many variants. As is the case with most other intracranial pathology, MRI is the investigation of choice for the diagnosis and characterisation of meningiomas. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/meningioma

Meningiomas are the most common extra-axial tumours of the central nervous system. They are a non-glial neoplasm that originates from the arachnoid cap cells of the meninges. Meningiomas have characteristic imaging findings although there are man.

The caput medusae sign, refers to developmental venous anomalies of the brain, where a number of veins drain centrally towards a single drain vein. The appearance is reminiscent of Medusa, a gorgon of Greek mythology, who was encountered and defeated by Perseus. The sign is seen on both CT and MRI when contrast is administered. Angiographically the caput medusa appearance is seen only in the venous phase. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/caput-medusae-sign-developmental-venous-anomalies

This case shows the typical appearance of a developmental venous anomaly (DVA) with a bunch of venous vessels in a "Medusa head". They are commonly located at the angle of ventricles, especially near frontal horn of the lateral ventricles.

Melanoma is the third most common primary neoplasm that metastasizes to the brain. MRI T1: typically hyperintense secondary to hemorrhage or melanin (as above) T2: typically hypointense T1 C+ (Gd): typically enhances in a peripheral rim pattern or a diffusely heterogeneous pattern. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/intracranial-metastatic-melanoma-2

Melanoma is the third most common primary neoplasm that metastasizes to the brain. MRI typically hyperintense secondary to hemorrhage or melanin (as above) typically hypointense C+ (Gd): typically enhances in a peripheral rim pattern or a dif

Cerebral arteriovenous malformation | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org

Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the most common symptomatic cerebrovascular malformations. Their most common presentation is intraparenchymal haematoma. Large AVMs are typically wedge-shaped lesions located in the watershed area.

Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease which results from the JC virus infecting oligodendrocytes. It is considered the most common clinical manifestation of JC virus infection in the brain. Patients with PML present with various neurological symptoms. It typically spares the optic nerve and the spinal cord. Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/progressive-multifocal-leukoencephalopathy

This case demonstrates typical appearances of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in a patient on HAART for HIV. It should be noted that this patient also has a high titre of BK virus, a relative of JC virus but not implicated in P.

Meningioma - olfactory groove | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org Large anterior cranial fossa mass filling the olfactory grooves. It demonstrates prominent spokewheel vascular supply and CSF cleft sign.

Typical appearances of a large anterior cranial fossa meningioma (where they can grow to impressive size with limited symptoms).

Haemangioblatomas are tumours of vascular origin and occur both in patients with von Hippel Lindau (vHL) as well as sporadically. They are WHO grade I tumours that can occur in the central nervous system or elsewhere in the body, including kidneys, liver and pancreas. Typically haemangioblastomas are sharply demarcated homogeneous masses composed of cyst with a solid enhancing mural nodule. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/haemangioblastoma-central-nervous-system

Haemangioblatomas are tumours of vascular origin and occur both in patients with von Hippel Lindau (vHL) as well as sporadically. They are WHO grade I tumours that can occur in the central nervous system or elsewhere in the body, including kidneys, liver and pancreas. Typically haemangioblastomas are sharply demarcated homogeneous masses composed of cyst with a solid enhancing mural nodule. http://radiopaedia.org/articles/haemangioblastoma-central-nervous-system

Aqueductal stenosis (AS) is a the most common cause of congenital obstructive hydrocephalus, but can also be seen in adults as an acquired abnormality. Better delineates the extent of obstructive hydrocephalus, with enlargement (often marked) of the lateral and third ventricles. The aqueduct may show funnelling superiorly. The 4th ventricle is not dilated. In cases of secondary obstruction the underlying abnormality may also be evident (e.g. tumour)…

The patient went on to have a third ventriculostomy which confirmed the presence of a pin-hole defect in the floor of the third ventricle, inadequate for treatment of non-communicating hydrocephalus.

Ependymoma. I bet you don't think of ependymomas looking like this usually, and yet ~20% are completely or mostly intraparenchymal and supratentorial! Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/ependymoma

An Ependymoma is a glial tumour which originate from the ependymal cells that line the ventricles of the brain, or the central canal of the spinal cord. These tumours typically account for of all.